School Improvement Plan

At the end of each academic year, the school collects data in all subjects and also speaks to the children, staff and parents/carers of the school to review the School Improvement Plan from the previous year and agree School Improvement Plan next steps for the year ahead.

Review of the School Improvement Plan 2021 – 2022:

The school successfully implemented The Little Wandle Phonics & Reading programme which saw a significant increase in the end of Early Years Reading level. The school also achieved 100% Year 2 re-sit Phonics Screening and slightly above national – 82.8% at the end of Year 1 Phonics.

The school successfully supported pupils with catching up from declining results due to Covid-19: 10 pupils in Reading across the school returned back to Exp from declining to WT & 4 pupils in Reading across the school returned back to GD from declining to Exp.7 pupils in Writing across the school returned back to Exp from declining to WT & 1 pupil in Writing across the school returned back to GD from declining to Exp. 14 pupils in Maths across the school returned back to Exp from declining to WT & 5 pupils in Maths across the school returned back to GD from declining to Exp. End of KS2 Results were significantly above national expectation – R: 94.0% W: 77.4%  M: 96.8%.

School Improvement Plan 2022 – 2023:

Key Area 1:

Aim:

To strengthen the quality of the children’s writing so that the number of children reaching the expected standard in each cohort is consistent across the school, aiming to be above 70.0% in each year group.

Rationale:

Although above national, data shows a lower percentage of pupils working at national expectation in Writing than Reading & Maths at the end of KS2.

In school data also shows some lower percentages in Writing in specific year groups.

Actions:

-Review examples of the children’s writing from 2021 – 2022 to assess what gaps in their writing there are and identifying the key issues that need to be addressed.

-Share findings from research with staff and discuss strategies to address these gaps.

– Ensure that there are regular handwriting and spelling sessions built into each class weekly timetable to that these areas of writing are given priority and taught both in lesson and discretely. Timetable separate basic punctuation lessons in KS1 so that this is taught outside of the English lesson and embedded during the English lesson.

-Further develop the pupil’s ability to self and peer edit their work, offering more guidance to the children on how to do this effectively. Re-launch a new approach to self and peer marking across the school. Allow more time for self & peer editing to take place.

-Implement a Writing Showcase display so that the children can see a range of different examples of their writing and view their writing journey in that year group (Linked to raising aspirations). Include some best pieces of published writing in the newsletter each month.

-Ensure that teachers always share WAGOLLs to show the children what a good example of writing looks like. In addition, ensure that the reading texts used to introduce the genre is of a good quality and serves also as a good example. Use these examples as a success criterion so that the children are clear on what they need to do to meet the expected standard or above.

-Arrange some visits from different authors / writers to support with inspiring the children to write with love and passion.

-Intervention to be implemented for any pupil identified as needing support with their writing such as additional handwriting sessions, SOS spellings, Write from the Start intervention and use of the ‘Mighty Writer’ (especially for KS2 and pupils with SEN).

-Create more opportunities in the classroom for the children to read their work in front of the class and to show this on the main class board, celebrating and discussing the quality of this work.

Key Area 2:

Aim:

To develop the children’s Vocabulary and Oracy skills so that they can articulate what they want to say clearly and precisely.

Rationale:

Research has found that developing a child’s Vocabulary and Oracy skills will support them in being able to:

  • explain their understanding and ideas

  • discuss with others to deepen their learning and

  • be competent in speaking and

  • make formal presentations with

  • demonstrate skills and share information to

  • participate in debates

Observations that took place during 2021 – 2022 identified that some children found it difficult to:

  • articulate their learning because they struggled to structure their thoughts in a way that made sense to others.

  • use the correct vocabulary to precisely say what they wanted to say.

Book monitoring that took place during 2021 – 2022 also identified that children were regularly missing opportunities to use key vocabulary in their work to enhance its standard and quality. This was especially noticeable in Maths.

Key Area 3:

Aim:

To target cohorts showing a lower percentage of pupils working at Greater Depth in Reading, Writing and/or Maths so that attainment within these cohorts is brought closer to 2022 national percentages for Greater Depth pupils (For KS1 Target: R=18%, W=8% & M=15% & for KS2 Target: R=28%, W=13% & M=22%).

To target pupils working at Greater Depth in Reading, Writing & Maths combined so that at the end of KS2, the school is at least in-line with national expectation for this group of pupils.

Rationale:

  • KS1 data shows a lower percentage of pupils achieving Greater Depth than national in Reading, Writing & Maths in 2022.

  • In-school data shows several cohorts with a lower percentage of pupils working at Greater Depth in Reading, Writing and/or Maths.

  • KS2 data shows a lower percentage of pupils achieving Greater Depth than national in Reading, Writing & Maths Combined.

Key Area 4:

Aim:

To support children in remembering more overtime so that they become competent and proficient in transferring prior knowledge into new learning. This will be evident when the children are articulating their learning to others.

Rationale:

Research shows that having a good working memory (WM) is critical for learning because it allows children to hold information in their mind whilst they are engaged in other activities. It also helps them to organise and process new material, making this a key component of academic success.

Observations that took place during 2021 – 2022 identified that some children found it difficult to:

  • Recall some of their prior leanring.

  • Naturally transfer prior knowledge from one subject to another subject.

Key Area 5:

Aim:

To reduce the number of pupils with attendance below 90% (Persistent Absentees) and increase attendance overall to at least above 95.0%.

Rationale:

Although, the school’s attendance is broadly in-line with national, since Covid-19, there has been a decrease in attendance and an increase in the number of pupils with attendance below 90.0%.

The number of holidays being taken during term time has also significantly increased, which the school is keen to reduce.

Actions:

-The school will have a team of staff dedicated to attendance that meet regularly to review the attendance of the pupils and agree next steps. This team will also be responsible for the promotion of good attendance across the school and supporting individual pupils and families that may require support with their attendance.

-The importance of attendance will be highlighted in the newsletter each half term and regularly on class dojo throughout the year.

-The children will be encouraged to achieve 100% attendance by being rewarded with certificates and small rewards at the end of each term.

The school will keep detailed records of all pupil absences and track this carefully.

-The school will operate a first response programme, which any parent/carer being called between 9.30am 10.00am if their child is not in school and they have not informed the school of the reasons why.

-At the end of each half term, the school will send letters out to any parent/carer whose child’s attendance is below 93%. The class teacher will then carefully monitor this attendance over the next few weeks and support the family wherever possible. If the attendance of this pupil does not improve, the teacher will refer the family to the Pastoral Mentor who will begin working more closely with this family.

-Any pupil with attendance below 90% will be requested to meet directly with the Learning Mentor to discuss this issue and an Early Help or Support Plan may be implemented.

The Pastoral Mentor will communicate with any parent/carer who applies to take their child out of school on holiday. A fine may be issued to any parent/carer who takes their child for this reason.

-The school will liaise with the Local Authority and seek guidance and support if they need to issue a Fine, Parenting Order, Education Supervision Order, School Attendance Order or Prosecution. Also, to seek further ideas on how to support the family.