IT & Computing

I.T. & Computing Curriculum Leader: Mrs Pridding

Response to COVID 19: 

At Hindsford, we are proud to say that we have ensured that every child has access to a device with which it is appropriate to access remote learning. However, the range of devices used by the children at home is broad and therefore, due to the wide range of software that we use, we are unable to continue to deliver our lessons as we would do if we were attending school as normal.  

Therefore, from January 2021, we have made the decision to deliver the theoretical aims of the national curriculum, specifically, the skill of Computational Thinking.  We deliver this content by drawing upon the Bebras resources, which have been designed to enable pupils to develop their computational thinking skills, whilst at the same time providing an introduction to more advanced computing concepts. 

Lessons include a puzzle, each of which  is aligned to one of the following computational thinking concepts,
 Patterns
 Algorithms
 Logic
 Abstraction

Here are some examples of the work that has been completed by the children.

 

Intent:

At Hindsford CE Primary School, we strive to deliver a high-quality computing curriculum which equips pupils to use computational thinking and creativity to understand and change the world.

It is therefore the intent of the IT & Computing Curriculum to:

  • Develop the core understanding of the principles of information and computation, how digital systems work, and how to put this knowledge to use through programming.
  • Equip our children to use information technology to create programs, systems and a range of content.
  • Ensure that pupils become digitally literate (able to use, and express themselves and develop their ideas through, information and communication technology) – at a level suitable for the future workplace and as active participants in a digital world.
  • To promote safe and sensible use of technology

 

Implementation:

EYFS

 In the Early Years, opportunities are presented to the children in order to meet ELG-15 ‘Technology’. 

Children recognise that a range of technology is used in places such as homes and schools. They select and use technology for particular purposes.

Children develop their skills in technology through a range of activities.  For example, when working with the teacher, children may be given tasks such as taking the photographs or making sound recordings.  The Early Years also have access to the computer suite and our Immersion Room where activities may be delivered such as using a Bee Bot to sequence a story.  Technology is also integrated into the role-play areas. For example, a telephone and computer may be accessible at a doctor’s surgery set up.  Observations are made of the children accessing technology in school and also conversations with children regarding the use of technology at home are recorded.  

  Key Stages 1 and 2

 In Key Stages 1 and 2, computing is taught in discreet, weekly, hour-long lessons using lesson plans and resources from ‘Kapow Primary’. However, these materials may be supplemented, or even replaced, by other resources at the class teachers’ discretion in order to ensure that the highest quality lessons are delivered.

Lessons are delivered in the computing suite where children have access to laptops, and shared access to iPads. However, a selection of lessons are ‘unplugged’ lessons which develop the understanding of computing and computational thinking without the use of technology. These may be delivered in classrooms.

Each lesson is based around delivering one or more of the national curriculum objectives and includes an ‘Attention Grabber’, then the ‘Main Event’ before ‘Wrapping Up’.

The Attention Grabber (10-15 minutes): Offers context for the lesson in an engaging manner to capture the interest of pupils and develop enthusiasm for the subject.

The Main Event (30-40 minutes): The main part of the lesson where the children are exposed to new learning, linked to the national curriculum objectives.

Wrapping Up (10 minutes): An opportunity for children to consolidate, summarise or evaluate their learning.  

Log books: after the lesson, the teacher evidences the work completed using a log book. This is a double page per objective and includes photos, written captions by the pupils, examples of work and also annotations by the teacher. 


Meeting our intent:

Hindsford’s computing curriculum is skills based. These skills are split into three main areas meet the National Curriculum Aims: Computer Science, Information Technology and Digital Literacy (including e-Safety).

Computer Science

  • Develop the core understanding of the principles of information and computation, how digital systems work, and how to put this knowledge to use through programming.

 The skills in this area are focused on Hardware, Networks and data representation, Programming, and Computational thinking. In computational thinking, we focus on 4 pillars: decomposition; pattern recognition; abstraction; and algorithm Design. In some year groups, these principles are taught discreetly (for example, Year 4). However, these fundamental principles are recapped frequently through a variety of opportunities. At the end of a teaching sequence, once the objective have been met, the class teacher may choose to include a discreet lesson focusing on computational thinking. The children learn the basics of programming using the block-coding program, Scratch Junior, before moving on to learn the language of Python as this is the program used at our local feeder high school.

Information Technology

  • Equip our children to use information technology to create programs, systems and a range of content.

Our curriculum offers a broad range of platforms for the children to develop their skills when using software, using email and the internet, using data and their understanding of the wider use of technology.

Digital Literacy and e-Safety

  • Ensure that pupils become digitally literate (able to use, and express themselves and develop their ideas through, information and communication technology) – at a level suitable for the future workplace and as active participants in a digital world.
  • To promote safe and sensible use of technology.

Whilst using a range of platforms, the children also focus on how to access digital content safely and with an appropriate amount of scrutiny. In order to prepare children for the working world, the children learn how to work safely online and also how to work collaboratively.

To highlight the importance of e-Safety with the children, we hold an annual e-Safety day during the Spring Term. This links to the PHSE curriculum.

 Below is:

A copy of the long term planning from Year 1 to year 6

(Please note, that due to COVID-19, that the long term plan for 2020-2021 is subject to change.  Please see the ‘Respose to COVID-19’ section at the top of this page)

A copy of the progression in skills for Computing & IT.

A copy of the National Curriculum for IT & Computing.

Here is just some of the hardware and software that we use to deliver our curriculum objectives

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Impact:

The intended impact of the Computing curriculum is that the majority of children in each year group are working at or exceeding the expected level for their age.

The impact of the curriculum is measured by:

  • Teacher assessments, completed at the end of each lesson
  • Pupil Voice discussions of their learning with the subject leader      
  • Regular lesson observations and learning walks
  • A learning log, completed for each objective with examples of the work completed and comments from the children 

 

E-Safety:

Today’s pupils are growing up in an increasingly complex world, living their lives seamlessly on and off line. This presents many positive and exciting opportunities, but also challenges and risks. As a school, we strive to equip our pupils with the knowledge needed to make the best use of the internet and technology in a safe, considered and respectful way so that they are able to reap the benefits of the online world.

In order to do this, E-Safety is taught through a variety of channels at Hindsford:

  • As part of our Computing & IT Curriculum. 
  • As part of our PSHE Curriculum.
  • During the celebration of special events such as Internet Safety Day.
  • During everyday teaching & learning as teachers take opportunities as and when issues or concerns present themselves.

Safer Internet Day 2021

Safer Internet day was particularly well-timed this year, with most children accessing their learning from home and therefore, spending far more time than usual online. Each class focused on an area of Internet Safety and you can see examples in the gallery below:

 

IT & Computing Gallery:       

Year 6: Introduction to Python

 

Staff Training:

In order from most recent :

January 2021: Training on computational thinking skills delivered remotely. 

October 2020: Teacher training regarding the delivery of the curriculum in times of home-learning

September 2020: Subject leader Immersion room training 

September 2020: INSET training to launch new scheme of work with all teachers. 

February 2020: Staff Meeting – AR and VR training on apps available to use in school. 

January 2020 :  Consortium Spring Term Curriculum Lead Meeting child event – Drone Days  

December 2019: Consortium Autumn Term Curriculum Lead Meeting – Deep Dives

June 2019: Consortium Summer Term Curriculum Lead Meeting – Action Planning

February 2019: Consortium Network Curriculum Lead Meeting – Sharing Good Practice

January 2019: Staff Meeting – Using the Immersion Room & Kahoot Training

September 2018 – December 2018: Apple Education Teaching Course

September 2018: Curriculum Leader Training